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Central Coast Section News

Planner In the Field | Massive Flooding at El Capitan Canyon
February 8, 2017

Planner in the Field | Massive Flooding at El Capitan CanyonJanuary 20,2017

Due to the recent heavy storms in Santa Barbara there has been massive flooding at the El Capitan Canyon. It is estimated that fifteen vehicles and five cabins were swept off their foundations and washed down the El Capitan Creek on January 20, 2017.  People staying at the campground during the incident report that “You could see the water level rising, and then all of a sudden you could see trees being ripped down and floating — like just logs and logs just floating by.”  There were an estimated 12 people trapped in these cabins in the original report, but it has since been released that 22 people from El Capitan Canyon and Resort Campground were rescued by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department Friday. Rescuers used a dual- tracked vehicle to make their way through the rushing water and heavy debris flow to bring people to safety. There was one women stranded in a van who had to be airlifted out and is now at Cottage Hospital with possible hypothermia. However, there are no reports of missing people or serious injuries. And though the El Capitan Campground has clearly suffered significant damage, their website states that they are monitoring things and look forward to welcoming guests back in the future.  

Summary by Sydney Bartone, student representative for the Central Coast Section of the American Planning Association’s California Chapter

Sources:

2017 APACA Conference Call for Nominations!
January 22, 2017 to February 1, 2017

The 2017 APA California Conference is scheduled to occur in Sacramento from September 23rd thru 26th at the Sacramento Convention Center and the call for presentations is open until January 31st 2017! Details on the Call for Presentations are available at apacalifornia-conference.org/call_for_presentations.

Proposed presentations should reflect the conference theme of Capitalizing on Our Diversity and include a diversity of opinions and presenters. Sessions must reflect one of the following five core conference tracks:

  • Lessons Learned: A Diverse Past
  • We're All In This Together: Implementing Diversity
  • Tips of the Trade: Diversifying the Tool Kit
  • Engage: Planning for Diverse Places and Perspectives
  • Embracing and Envisioning Change: A Diverse Future
Image icon 2017 APACA Conference - Call for Presentations
Considering taking the AICP Exam?
January 16, 2017 to May 31, 2017

As you may have heard, the APA/AICP has updated ​the exam content and reading list for planning professionals sitting for the exam beginning in May 2017. This is the first comprehensive update of the AICP Certification Exam since 2007. Click here for information on the exam update, and good luck!

2017 SCAG Sustainability Awards Due January 23rd 2017
January 3, 2017

2017 SCAG SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS DUE JANUARY 23rd, 2017

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) is committed to highlighting innovative and outstanding planning efforts from local agencies in sustainability. These projects are the integral to carrying out the goals and policies of the 2016 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS), and promote a cleaner and healthier Southern California. Each year, SCAG honors projects that best exemplify the core principles of sustainability with awards at the Annual Regional Conference & General Assembly.

Learn more at sustain.scag.ca.gov

 

Register Now for APA's National Planning Conference
December 17, 2016

 

CHICAGO — Immerse yourself in the latest planning trends and innovations at the 2017 American Planning Association (APA) National Planning Conference in New York City, May 6–9, 2017. The largest planning event of its kind will take place in one of the world’s most influential cities.

APA members get first access to conference registration and tickets through January 3, 2017. Registration and ticket purchases for everyone opens January 4, 2017.

The peer-reviewed event offers four days to connect, share, and discuss how communities are taking advantage of opportunities and addressing the challenges of today, and tomorrow.

Nearly 5,000 attendees from around the country — even the world — are anticipated to attend and reap the benefits of all the conference offers, including:

  • Two hundred and fifty conference sessions designed for all attendees from the advanced practitioner to the early career professional.
  • Twelve tracks that focus on specific planning topics including fiscal analysis, resiliency, zoning, parks, and redevelopment.
  • Fifty-five mobile workshops, guided by local practitioners, take conference attendees into the community and surrounding region to learn in-depth and get an up-close experience of planning in the Big Apple. Topics include stormwater management, disaster recovery, and waterfront.
  • Keynote speakers who will challenge and inspire. Peter Leyden — a globally recognized expert on new technologies and future trends and former managing editor of Wired magazine — will explore how the digital revolution will reinvent America in the opening keynote. Concluding the conference is Peter Kageyama, author of For the Love of Cities and Love Where You Live. Kageyama focuses on bottom-up community development and the people who are making change happen.

Access NPC17 news and information on social media using #NPC17. The conference also offers a suite of Certification Maintenance credits and CEUs. Early registration rates are available through March 2, 2017. Register early to ensure your spot!

The 2017 APA National Planning Conference is made possible by the generous support from the following sponsors: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Esri, AECOM, and Woods & Poole Economics, Inc.

American Planning Association news release, December 8, 2016

UC Berkeley Expands Transportation Planning Training Series
November 13, 2016 to January 31, 2017

UC Berkeley Expands Transportation Planning Training Series

The Technology Transfer Program (Tech Transfer), a division of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, is the California transportation community's source for professional training, expert assistance, and information resources. 

For the academic year 2016-2017, Tech Transfer is expanding its Transportation Planning training series to include the hottest topics in professional practice today, including innovative bikeways, parking management, TODs, BRT planning, commercial site development, VMT analysis, and multimodal operations.  Tech Transfer’s updated and recently expanded Transportation Planning training series addresses a critical need for professional development among the rank and file, as well as management levels, of public agencies throughout California (and beyond), those who are tasked with planning future land use development and/or programming future transportation investments. 

All courses have AICP CM credits, pending AICP approval.  All of the featured courses are subsidized for California local agency employees under the Caltrans Cooperative Training Assistance Program.

Learn more online at registration.techtransfer.berkeley.edu

Legislative Update: Which Bills Made It?
November 10, 2016 to January 31, 2017

Which Bills Made It?

Many bills were approved by Governor Brown this past September 2016. The ones most relevant to the planning profession are summarized below. Second units and density bonus were big topics this legislative session, reflecting the trend to nip away at the housing deficit in small but possibly significant ways, mostly by streamlining already existing processes. Three bills pertaining to second units and three bills addressing residential density bonus reached the Governor and became law. Many of the provisions of these bills overlap, and deciphering them can be a challenge. Several key questions remain to be answered.  With the same goal of creating more affordable housing, one bill provides a commercial density bonus to a developer that partners with an affordable housing developer. Air quality and greenhouse gas reductions continue to be important, as well as environmental justice. There are many more bills the Governor approved, including relating to parking, autonomous vehicle programs, CDBG and economic development. A summary of these bills by the League of California Cities can be found at http://www.cacities.org/Top/News/News-Articles/2016/October/Governor-s-Action-on-League-Priority-Bills-Mostly.

Accessory Dwelling Units

AB 2406 (Thurmond) Housing: junior accessory dwelling units.

Existing law authorizes a local agency to approve an ordinance allowing the construction of second units in single-family and multi-family residential areas. This bill, adding Section 65852.22 to the Government Code, authorizes a local agency to approve an ordinance to create junior accessory dwelling units in single-family residential zones. Such an ordinance is voluntary on the part of a local jurisdiction. A junior accessory dwelling unit is defined in the bill as a unit no more than 500 square feet in size and contained entirely within an existing single-family structure. A local agency may require a permit (type not specified) for the junior accessory dwelling unit. It may include separate sanitation facilities, or may share sanitation facilities with the existing structure. If a local agency adopts such an ordinance, the number of junior accessory units is limited to one per residential lot zoned for single-family residences with a single-family residence already built on the lot. The single-family residence must be owner-occupied, unless the owner is another governmental agency, land trust or housing organization. The unit must be constructed within the existing walls of the residence, include an efficiency kitchen, and have a separate entrance from the residence’s main entrance, along with an interior entry to the main living area. A deed restriction must be recorded stipulating certain requirements, including prohibiting the sale of the unit separately from the main residence and a restriction on the size and attributes of the unit that conforms with the bill. Lastly, an ordinance shall not require additional parking as condition of the permit.

Approved by Governor: September 28, 2016. Takes Effect: Immediately.

 

AB 2299 (Bloom) Land use: housing: 2nd units

 This bill is to streamline the approval process and reduce the costs for constructing second units, a term which this bill now replaces with “accessory dwelling units” (ADUs). An ADU is defined as, 

“an attached or a detached residential dwelling unit which provides complete independent living facilities for one or more persons. It shall include permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation on the same parcel as the single-family dwelling is situated.” An ADU may also be an efficiency unit as defined in Section 17958.1 or a manufactured home as defined in Section 18007, of the Health and Safety Code. The bill, which amends Government Code Section 65852.2, stipulates what a local agency’s ADU ordinance may include, and limits the ability of a local agency to regulate ADUs.  ADUs must be ministerial actions. Local agencies are required to submit a copy of their ADU ordinance to HCD within 60 days of adoption. The bill does not state that the HCD must formally accept or approve the ordinance. If an ordinance imposes requirements beyond those allowed by state law, those local provisions are pre-empted as of January 1, 2017, and only state standards may be enforced. If a local agency does not adopt an ordinance in compliance with state law, it is required to approve or disapprove an ADU ministerially, applying only the state standards.  Currently, parking requirements for ADUs may not exceed one parking space per unit or per bedroom, and additional parking may be required upon making certain findings. With this bill, a local agency may not require such additional parking. Required parking spaces may be provided in tandem within a driveway. Further, parking standards may not be imposed when the ADU is located within one-half mile of public transit (“public transit” is not defined, but is being interpreted to mean at least a bus stop); is located within an architecturally and historically significant historic district; is part of the existing primary residence or an existing accessory structure; when on-street parking permits are required but not offered to the occupant of the accessory dwelling unit; or when there is a car share vehicle located within one block of the ADU. A local agency may not require a new or separate utility connection directly between the accessory dwelling unit and the utility or impose a related connection fee or capacity charge. The ADU shall not be considered a new residential use in terms of agency connection fees or capacity charges for utilities, including water or sewer. Lastly, an ADU ordinance shall be exempt from CEQA.

Approved by Governor: September 27, 2016. Takes Effect: January 1, 2017.

 

SB 1069 (Wieckowski) Land Use: Zoning

Senate Bill 1069 contains all of the provisions in AB 2299, with a few exceptions. Most important, SB 1069 stipulates a time line for approval, requiring ministerial approval of an ADU within 120 days of a complete building permit application submittal. To require an ADU to conform to development standards, such as height and setback, the ADU ordinance must state that the unit needs to conform to the underlying zoning. SB 1069 does not specify that an ADU ordinance must be submitted to HCD. It states that a local agency must ministerially approve an application for a building permit to create within a single-family residential zone one accessory dwelling unit per single-family lot if the unit is contained within the existing space of a single-family residence or accessory structure, has independent exterior access from the existing residence, and the side and rear setbacks are sufficient for fire safety. Accessory dwelling units shall not be required to provide fire sprinklers if they are not required for the primary residence. The increased floor area of an attached accessory dwelling unit shall not exceed 50 percent of the existing living area, with a maximum increase in floor area of 1,200 square feet. The bill does not note whether a local agency can restrict the size to less than 1,200 square feet. The bill allows an agency to reduce or eliminate parking requirements for any unit. It further stipulates that off ­street parking shall be permitted in setback areas in locations determined by the local agency or through tandem parking in a driveway, unless specific findings are made that parking in setback areas or tandem parking is not feasible based upon specific site or regional topographical or fire and life safety conditions, or that it is not permitted anywhere else in the jurisdiction. SB 1069 amends Government Code Sections 65582.1, 65583.1, 65589.4, 65852.150, 65852.2, and 66412.2.

Approved by Governor: September 27, 2016

Takes Effect: January 1, 2017

 

Density Bonus

AB 2501 (Bloom) Housing: Density Bonuses.

AB 2442 (Holden) Density Bonuses.

AB 2556 (Nazarian) Density Bonuses.

These three Assembly Bills amend Government Code Section 65915. All were approved by the Governor on September 28, 2016 and take effect this coming January 1, 2017. There is much overlap in these three bills. Together, the bills require a local government to adopt procedures and timelines for processing a density bonus application, provide a list of documents and information required to be submitted with the application for it to be deemed complete, and notify the applicant whether it is complete. Currently, state density bonus law requires a local government to grant a proposal for specific incentives or concessions requested by an applicant unless the local government makes written findings, based on substantial evidence, that the concession or incentive is not required in order to provide affordable housing costs or for rents for the targeted units. The new provisions slightly change that, making the local government provide the requested concessions or incentives unless it finds, based on substantial evidence, that the concession or incentive does not result in identifiable and actual cost reductions. Therefore, the local government now bears the burden of proof for the denial of a requested concession or incentive. Further, the new legislation does not allow a local government to condition the submission, review, or approval of an application on the preparation of an additional report or study that is not otherwise required by state law (which may provide information on whether a concession/incentive is needed to make the units affordable). Yet, the new laws state that the term “study” does not include reasonable documentation to establish eligibility for the concession or incentive, and local governments are not prohibited from requiring an applicant to provide reasonable documentation to establish eligibility for a requested density bonus, incentives or concessions; waivers or reductions of development standards, and parking ratios. It appears that what exactly a local government may request in order to evaluate the concession/incentive is a little murky.  In addition, the bills require each component of any density calculation that results in fractional units to be rounded up to the next whole number; redefines a “housing development” to include mixed-use developments; and allows for a density bonus if ten percent of the total dwelling units in a housing development are allotted for transitional foster youth or the homeless or disabled. The new legislation also further addresses replacement units, particularly issues of rent or price controls, if a density bonus is requested on a property occupied with existing occupied housing units.

 

AB 1934 (Santiago) Planning and zoning: development bonuses: mixed-use projects.

This bill requires a local agency to grant a density bonus to a commercial developer when the developer agrees to partner with an affordable housing developer to create a joint project, or two separate projects. An agreement between the housing and commercial developers identifying how and when the affordable units would be provided and shall be approved by the local agency. The housing developer must provide at least 30 percent of the total units for low-income households or at least 15 percent for very low-income households. The housing would need to be constructed on the site of the commercial development, or on a site that meets all of the following conditions: within the boundaries of the local government; in close proximity to public amenities, including schools and employment centers; and located within one-half mile a major transit stop as defined in Section 21155 of the Public Resources Code. The bonus granted to a commercial developer would be in the form of incentives, mutually agreed upon by the developer and the jurisdiction, that may include, but would not be limited to, up to a 20 percent increase in the maximum allowable intensity in the General Plan, in the maximum allowable floor area ratio, and in the maximum height requirements; up to a 20 percent reduction in minimum parking requirements; a limited-use/limited-application elevator for upper floor accessibility; and an exception to a zoning ordinance or other land use regulation. The affordable housing may be contributed by the commercial developer in any one of the following ways: (1) the commercial developer may directly build the units; (2) the commercial developer may donate a portion of the site or property elsewhere to the affordable housing developer to use as a site for affordable housing; or (3) the commercial developer may make a cash payment to the affordable housing developer to be used towards the cost of constructing the affordable housing project. The local agency may withhold a Certificate of Occupancy for the commercial development if the affordable housing developer does not begin construction of the units in accordance with the agreement. The bill also requires a local agency to submit to HCD as part of its annual report information describing a commercial development bonus approved. Assembly Bill 1934 sunsets January 1, 2022.

 Approved by Governor: September 27, 2016. Takes Effect: January 1, 2017.

 

Greenhouse Gases and Air Quality

SB 32 (Pavley) California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006: emissions limit.

 Senate Bill 32 is an extension of AB 32 (2006), the Global Warming Solutions Act, and adds Section 38566 to the Health and Safety Code. While AB 32 required that California cut its emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, SB 32 requires a reduction in statewide emissions of greenhouse gases to at least the 1990 emissions level by 2020 and to maintain and continue reductions thereafter. The bill does not address the methods to reduce greenhouse gases, and does not extend the cap and trade program. An effort to address cap and trade may be forthcoming in 2017, as the Governor has indicated support. SB 32 was approved with AB 197, discussed below, as one package.

Approved by Governor: September 8, 2016. Takes Effect: January 1, 2017.

 

AB 197 (Garcia) State Air Resources Board: greenhouse gases: regulations.

AB 197 amends and adds to the Health and Safety Act, and is a companion bill to SB 32. This bill would require the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to make available on its website, which is to be updated at least annually, the emissions of greenhouse gases, criteria pollutants, and toxic air contaminants for each facility that reports to the state board and air districts, stationary sources broken down to a local and sub-county level, and mobile sources at the county level. The bill would require the CARB, at least once a year at a hearing of the Joint Legislative Committee on Climate Change Policies, to present information on the reported emissions of greenhouse gases, criteria pollutants, and toxic air contaminants from all sectors covered by the scoping plan. The CARB must approve a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020, and prepare and approve a scoping plan for achieving the maximum technologically feasible and cost-effective reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The CARB must follow specified requirements when adopting rules and regulations to achieve greenhouse gas emissions reductions beyond the statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit to protect the state’s most impacted and disadvantaged communities, consider the social costs of the emissions of greenhouse gases, and prioritize specified emission reduction rules and regulations. The bill requires that CARB identify specified information for each emissions reduction measure, including each alternative compliance mechanism, market-based compliance mechanism, and potential monetary and nonmonetary incentives when updating the scoping plan.  For more information, check the CARB website at www.arb.ca.gov/cc/scopingplan/meetings/meetings.htm.

Approved by Governor: September 8, 2016. Takes Effect: January 1, 2017.

 

Environmental Justice

SB 1000 (Leyva) Land use: general plans: safety and environmental justice.

Senate Bill 1000 amends Government Code Section 65302. For local jurisdictions with disadvantaged communities, a General Plan must now include a separate Environmental Justice Element, or environmental justice related goals, policies and objectives must be integrated in other elements. A “disadvantaged community” is defined in the bill as an area defined by the Cal EPA per Health and Safety Code Section 39711 or a low-income area that is disproportionately affected by environmental pollution and other hazards that can lead to negative health effects, exposure, or environmental degradation. The goals, policies and objectives must: (1) reduce the unique or compounded health risks in disadvantaged communities by reducing pollution exposure, improving air quality, promoting food access, providing safe and sanitary homes, and providing for physical activity; (2) promote civil engagement in public decision making processes; (3) and prioritize improvements and programs that address the need of disadvantaged communities. The Environmental Justice Element or such goals, policies and objectives provided elsewhere in the General Plan would be required to be adopted or reviewed upon the adoption or next revision of two or more elements concurrently on or after January 1, 2018. Previously, the Safety Element was required to be reviewed and updated for flooding and fire hazards upon the next revision of the Housing Element or local hazard mitigation plan in some cases, and revised if any new information was identified that was not previously available. The bill requires a planning agency to now revise the Safety Element to identify new information only pertaining to flooding and fires.

 Approved by Governor: September 24, 2016. Takes Effect: January 1, 2017.

Happy Halloween from the Central Coast Section of the American Planning Association
October 30, 2016 to November 30, 2016

Happy Halloween from the Central Coast Section! Did you attend the recent conference in Pasadena and sit in on a scary good session? Tell us what you felt were the best topics at the conference by emailing our section's Public Information Officer.

California Legislative Summary
August 24, 2016

by Allison Cook, APA Central Coast Legislative Officer

 

Summer is over, but these bills are still going. Here’s a rundown on some of the planning-related bills still moving in the Legislature.

GHG Emission Targets to Be On Governor’s Desk

Senate Bill 32 (Introduced by Pavley), which extends 2006’s AB 32 greenhouse gas emission targets from 2020 to 2030, is to be considered by the Governor. The intent of the Legislature is to send this bill to the Governor for his signature right away. The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 designates the State Air Resources Board as the state agency charged with monitoring and regulating sources of emissions of greenhouse gases. The state board is required to approve a statewide greenhouse gas emissions limit equivalent to the statewide greenhouse gas emissions level in 1990 to be achieved by 2020 and to adopt rules and regulations in an open public process to achieve the maximum, technologically feasible, and cost-effective greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The bill would require the state board to ensure that statewide greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to 40 percent below the 1990 level by 2020. For more information and full text of the bill, go to https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160SB32.

 

AB 1934 (Santiago) - Density Bonus for Commercial Development

As currently proposed, this bill would require a city or county to grant a density bonus to a commercial developer when the developer agrees to partner with an affordable housing developer to create a joint project, or two separate projects. The housing would need to be constructed on the site of the commercial development, or on a site that is within the boundaries of the local government; in close proximity to public amenities, including schools and employment centers; and located within one-half mile a major transit stop as defined in the Public Resources Code. The bonus granted to a commercial developer would be in the form of incentives, mutually agreed upon by the developer and the jurisdiction, that may include, but would not be limited to, up to a 20 percent increase in the maximum allowable intensity in the General Plan, in the maximum allowable floor area ratio, and in the maximum height requirements; up to a 20 percent reduction in minimum parking requirements; use of a limited-use/limited-application elevator for upper floor accessibility; and an exception to a zoning ordinance or other land use regulation. California APA remains concerned about the possible concessions that cities and counties would be required to grant, such as 20 percent increases in floor area ratio, and other requirements. Other groups, such as the California State Association of Counties, question whether a commercial development bonus program is warranted or needed to incentivize affordable housing development.

 

AB 2208 (Santiago) - Inventory of Sites to Include Housing Sites above Local Government Buildings and Underutilized Sites

The state’s Planning and Zoning Law requires that the General Plan Housing Element for each city and county include an inventory of land suitable for residential development. This bill would revise the definition of land suitable for residential development to include the airspace above sites owned or leased by a city or county.

 

AB 2299 (Bloom) - Mandatory Second Unit Ordinances and Reduced Parking Requirements

This bill would require a local agency to provide by ordinance for the creation of second units in single-family and multi-family residential zones. The bill proposes to change the term “second” unit to “accessory” unit; provides for one parking space per accessory unit, which many be reduced or eliminated by a local agency; and requires an application for an accessory unit to be considered ministerially within 120 days of a local agency receiving an application. Moreover, the bill provides that the total area of floor space for a detached accessory unit shall not exceed 1,200 square feet, and for an attached, the increased floor area of the accessory unit shall not exceed 50 percent of the existing living area.

 

AB 2501 (Bloom) - New Density Bonus Requirements

This bill attempts to strengthen the ability of a developer to receive a density bonus, while placing further parameters on local agencies in evaluating density bonus proposals. The bill requires any density calculation that results in fractional units to be rounded up to the next whole number, and removes the ability of the local agency to ask the developer for financial information to determine the need for a requested concession, incentive or waiver from a development standard. Additionally, the local agency would now bear the burden of proof for the denial of a requested concession or incentive. “Housing development” would be clarified to also include residential units that are part of a mixed-use development.           

 

AB 2502 (Mullin) - Inclusionary Housing Programs

This bill would amend the California Planning and Zoning Law to outline the importance of Inclusionary Housing Ordinances in providing affordable housing in the state, and, in light of the Palmer/Sixth Street Properties v. City of Los Angeles (2009) decision, the bill reaffirms the authority of local jurisdictions to include requirements related to the provision of rental units in Inclusionary Housing Ordinances.

 

SB 1000 (Leyva) - Mandatory Environmental Justice Element in General Plan

Much of the concern with the original bill has been addressed, with the authors incorporating language suggested by APA California and other groups in this amended version. For local jurisdictions with disadvantaged communities (which the bill defines), a General Plan must now include a separate Environmental Justice Element, or environmental justice related goals, policies and objectives must be integrated in other elements. The goals, policies and objectives must: (1) reduce the unique or compounded health risks in disadvantaged communities by reducing pollution exposure, improving air quality, promoting food access, providing safe and sanitary homes, and providing for physical activity; (2) promote civil engagement in public decision making processes; (3) and prioritize improvements and programs that address the need of disadvantaged communities. The Environmental Justice Element or such goals, policies and objectives provided elsewhere in the General Plan would be required to be adopted or reviewed upon the adoption or next revision of two or more elements concurrently on or after January 1, 2018.

 

SB 1069 (Wieckowski) - Accessory Dwelling Unit Ordinances and Reduced Parking Requirements

This bill is very similar to AB 2299 (Bloom). The primary difference is the provision of parking. This bill proposes that parking requirements for an accessory unit shall not exceed one per unit or bedroom. However, a local agency may not require parking in the following situations: (1) where the unit is located within 1/2 mile of public transit; (2) where the unit is located within an architectural or historically significant historic district; (3) where the unit is not part of the primary residence or an existing accessory structure; (4) when on-street parking requires a permit, but no parking permit is offered to the occupant of the accessory unit; and (5) when there is a car share vehicle located within one block of an accessory unit.

Planning Academy Dates Announced in San Luis Obispo
September 29, 2016 to November 17, 2016

The Central Coast Section of the California Chapter of the American Planning Association will host its Citizen Planning Academy, an 8-week course in local land use planning and civic engagement. The Academy is open to all residents of San Luis Obispo County and will occur on Thursday evenings at the end of September thru the end of November, beginning September 29 and held at Wallace Group 612 Clarion Court San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 from 6:00 – 9:00 PM. 

The Academy is designed to provide an overview of local government, how it is financed, and the impact of State and Federal laws, environmental policy, and planning issues facing the County and its cities today. The program will include seven evening meetings to help participants become more informed, confident and comfortable in participating in local land use planning decisions.

In a mix of lecture, panel discussion and group interaction, the Academy will cover a range of planning topics: zoning history and legal context; environmental review laws and procedures; natural resource management; redevelopment, government and real estate economics; regional government,; transportation and infrastructure; urban design; water and utility planning and constraints, affordable housing, ethics and civic engagement. Each evening will cover a different topic. 

Applications to participate in the planning academy and more information are available on the CCAPA website at centralcoastapa.org/programs or by calling Tammy Seale calling 805-250-7974.

PDF icon 2016 Planning Academy_SLO_FLyer

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